90% of drivers would support breathalysers being installed in cars

Ninety per cent of drivers would support breathalysers being installed in cars to prevent drink-driving, research from WhoCanFixMyCar.com has found.

The company surveyed 1,000 people in response to Department for Transport figures which showed that an estimated 9,040 people were injured or killed on Britain’s roads in 2016 in incidents where a driver was over the legal drink-drive limit.

The figure, an increase of 7% on the previous year, represents about one in 20 of all casualties in reported road accidents in 2016.

An estimated 230 people died in drink-drive crashes during the year, up from 200 in 2015.

The breathalysers would ensure that only people who are under the legal alchol limit would be able to physically drive their vehicle.

Al Preston, co-founder of WhoCanFixMyCar.com, said: “With Christmas on the horizon, social drinking sees an increase around this time of year and ultimately this increases the risk of drink driving on UK roads.

“We were interested to see from our database who would agree with car breathalysers, deciding if drivers are fit to drive or not.

“Although we were expecting to see a positive response, we were amazed to see just how many drivers would like to see the devices put in place in the UK – with over 90% of our database having a positive reaction.”

The legal limit for drinking in England, Wales and Northern Ireland is 80mg of alcohol in 100ml of blood.

This translates to two pints of normal-strength beer for men or a large glass of wine for women. Scotland has a separate, more stringent limit to the rest of the UK, at 50mg of alcohol to 100ml of blood.

Drivers that get caught driving under the influence can face a multitude of fines and charges including a minimum 12-month driving ban, unlimited fine and a possible prison sentence.

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